How many ounces should a 1week old eat?

Quick Answers

The amount of breastmilk or formula a 1 week old baby needs can vary, but some general guidelines are:

  • 1-1.5 ounces per feeding
  • 8-12 feedings per day
  • Up to 90 ml (3 ounces) per feeding
  • 700-1,050 ml (24-35 ounces) per day

However, every baby is different. It’s best to feed your baby on demand, watching for cues that they are hungry or full, rather than sticking to a strict schedule. Their stomach capacity is still very small at this age.

How Often Should a 1 Week Old Eat?

Newborns need to eat frequently because their tiny stomachs can only hold small amounts at a time. At 1 week old, most babies need to eat every 1.5 to 3 hours, which amounts to 8-12 times in a 24 hour period.

Feeding on demand is recommended rather than sticking to a strict schedule. This means feeding your baby whenever they show signs of hunger, such as:

  • Moving mouth and tongue
  • Sucking on fingers
  • Rooting reflex (turning head towards breast or bottle)
  • Increased alertness or activity
  • Crying

Crying is a late sign of hunger, so try to look for earlier cues. But if your baby is crying, offer them a feed just in case hunger is the reason.

It’s fine if your baby wants to eat a bit more or less frequently. Follow their lead and watch to see if they seem satisfied after feeds. With time you will get to know their patterns.

How Much Should a 1 Week Old Eat Per Feeding?

At 1 week old, babies have very small stomach capacities, only about the size of a marble. They will need multiple feedings with small amounts at each session.

For breastfed babies, they will likely eat around 1-1.5 ounces per feeding during the first weeks. Breastmilk digests quickly, so they will get hungry again faster compared to formula.

Formula fed infants may take up to 2-3 ounces per feeding, but may start with 1-2 ounces at first. Formula stays in the stomach a bit longer so feedings can be a little less frequent.

For both breastmilk and formula, the range is usually 1-1.5 ounces every 1.5 to 3 hours. Allow your baby to eat until they seem satisfied, without forcing them to finish a bottle if they push it away or fall asleep.

Stomach Capacity Guidelines

Here are some general guidelines on stomach capacity for newborns:

Age Stomach Capacity
Birth to 1 week 5-7 mL
1 to 2 weeks 22-27 mL
2 to 3 weeks 45-60 mL
1 month 60-81 mL

However, these are just averages. Feed on demand and watch your baby for cues that they are full or still hungry.

How Many Ounces Per Day for a 1 Week Old?

Adding up the recommended intake per feeding over 8-12 feedings a day, most 1 week old babies will take in about 24-35 ounces per day.

However, this can vary a lot by the individual. Some babies will be at the lower end, eating 20-25 ounces per day, while others have a bigger appetite and may eat closer to 30 ounces in a day.

Instead of focusing on the exact daily amounts, pay attention to hunger and fullness cues during each feeding session. As long as your baby seems satisfied and is having plenty of wet and dirty diapers, they are likely getting enough to eat.

Daily Intake Guidelines

Here are some general daily intake guidelines:

Age Recommended Daily Intake
0-2 weeks 24-35 ounces breastmilk or formula
2-5 weeks 35-40 ounces breastmilk or formula
6-8 weeks 35-45 ounces breastmilk or formula

But again, focus on your individual baby’s cues rather than sticking strictly to the averages. Their needs may be more or less.

Growth Spurts

It’s common for 1 week old babies to cluster feed, which is when they eat more frequently for several hours at a time. This signals a growth spurt, when they need extra calories to support their development.

During growth spurts, don’t be surprised if your newborn wants to eat every 1-2 hours, or demands feedings around the clock. This intense feeding is only temporary and helps boost your milk supply.

Growth spurts typically last 24-48 hours. Feed on demand whenever your baby shows hunger cues during this time. The more you nurse or pump, the more milk will be produced.

Tips for Feeding a 1 Week Old

Watch for hunger cues

Don’t wait for crying, which is a late sign of hunger. Early cues include increased alertness, rooting, and sucking motions.

Feed on demand

Whenever your baby shows signs of hunger, offer a breast or bottle. Don’t try to impose a strict schedule.

Pace bottle feeding

Feed slowly and frequently burp to avoid overfilling their tiny stomach. Let them suck and pause when needed.

Offer both sides

At each feeding, alternate which breast you start with. Newborns need to empty both sides.

Watch for fullness cues

Signs your baby is full include closed mouth, relaxed arms and hands, and stopping or slowing sucking.

Burp frequently

Burp every 2-3 ounces or 5-10 minutes of feeding to prevent gas buildup.

Common Concerns

Not lasting between feedings

It’s normal for 1 week olds to eat frequently. Try feeding at the first signs of hunger before crying starts.

Spitting up often

As long as your baby seems content, frequent small spit ups are not unusual. Burp and hold them upright during and after feeds.

Not waking for night feedings

Gently rouse them if 4 hours pass without eating. Until back to birth weight, newborns should feed every 2-3 hours.

Not regaining birth weight

Consult your pediatrician if your baby hasn’t regained their birth weight by 2 weeks old. Supplementing or pumping after feeds may help.

When to Call the Doctor

See your pediatrician if your 1 week old:

  • Hasn’t had a wet diaper in over 8 hours
  • Has fewer than 4-5 wet diapers per day
  • Hasn’t had a dirty diaper in over 24 hours
  • Refuses to eat or sucks weakly for multiple feeds
  • Shows signs of dehydration – no tears, dry mouth, sunken soft spot
  • Loses weight or fails to gain weight

Other reasons to call include fever, persistent vomiting, blood in stool, or any other concerning symptoms. Trust your instincts if you feel something is wrong.

Conclusion

Feeding a newborn on demand is key, rather than sticking to a rigid schedule. At 1 week old, breastfed babies usually take 1-1.5 ounces per feeding, while formula fed infants may work up to 2-3 ounces. But stomach capacity is still very small, so feed 8-12 times daily.

Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues, and contact your pediatrician if you have any concerns. With time you will get to know your baby’s unique patterns and needs.

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